Ethnicity, Reconciliation, & Justice

By Christopher K. Lee

People often ask me what my ethnicity is. Usually they assume I am Chinese—or Korean, if they have never met a Korean person before.

By Katelin Hansen

The month of February is set aside to reflect on the many Black leaders who have shaped United States history, and who are often unjustly skimmed over in our classrooms.

By Lisa Rieck

In January at our blog, we’ve been looking at spiritual practices that can open us to the Holy Spirit’s sanctifying work in our lives.

By Greg Jao
During the summer of 1991, I ate at tables throughout southern China as I helped lead an InterVarsity Christian Fellowship Global Project in China. I was not supposed to be in China that summer.
By Willie Krischke

Would Jesus eat frybread? That was the question 150 Native American students and staff from around the country gathered to discuss November 9–11 in Window Rock, Arizona (the capital of the Navajo nation).

By Drew Larson

In 28 hours I can be in Thailand.  I just looked it up, thanks to the miracle of the Internet, although I use that term loosely (miracle, not Internet). Right this moment, I can book a flight from Chicago to Bangkok and be wheels-up to Thailand in six hours, carrying nothing with me except a messenger bag filled with beef jerky...

By Chris Nielson

How often do we view our citizenship as a gift that we’ve been given to steward?

By Alice Lor

The year I graduated from law school turned out to be a momentous occasion for my relatives. That year, not only did I graduate from law school, but I also had one cousin graduate from law school and another graduate from pharmacy school. 

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