Ethnicity, Reconciliation, & Justice

By Amy Hauptman

This December, Ram will address nearly 20,000 participants at Urbana 12, the largest student missions gathering in the world.

By Grace Biskie

I grew up in a home where my older, white brother called me a "stupid little nigger" more times than I can count, and where I countered with "ignorant, loser honky!" more times than I care to admit.

By Brennan Takayama

When I moved back to Hawai‘i in 2007, I participated in Ho‘olohe Pono—a two week summer immersion into the Native Hawaiian community—to listen, learn, and serve with the aloha (love) of Jesus. 

By Noemi Vega

This summer, seventeen InterVarsity staff and students took part in Borderlands, a special track of the Los Angeles Urban Project. They spent time in Tijuana, San Diego, and Fresno to learn more about the issue of immigration and to understand the issue through a Christian lens. 

By Alejandra Ortiz Chacón

This summer, seventeen InterVarsity staff and students took part in Borderlands, a special track of the Los Angeles Urban Project. They spent time in Tijuana, San Diego, and Fresno to learn more about the issue of immigration and to understand the issue through a Christian lens.  

By Sasha Mackoon

The train was taking almost twenty to thirty minutes to leave, when a man walking on his two hands and one foot, went onto the ladies’ train car.

By Guyana Hand

My neighborhood’s the type of place InterVarsity students might visit for an Urban Project. It’s the type of place people lock their car doors as they drive through. Quite frankly, it’s the type of place young people don’t return to after college. 

By Lisa Liou

The danger of labels on both sides is that we end up pitting ourselves against other Christians, seeing our political identity as more defining that our shared identity in Christ. Instead, we need to love our brothers and sisters in Christ, especially when they are opposite of us.

By Laura Li

After attending the Asian Pacific Islander Women's Leadership Conference (APIWLC), I've been reflecting on what it means for me to be a leader as an Asian American woman.

By Abi Christian

You may have never heard of Rev. Calisto Odede, but he’s helped thousands of students to consider God’s calling on their lives and in the Church.

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